V Ks Blog

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I found Sarah after reading the Sober Revolution. I was sat in a bar in Spain having afternoon wine whilst my son sat on his iPad, I knew it wasn’t right and I needed help, so I emailed the Harrogate Sanctuary.
The course is 6 weeks of daily emails with weekly FaceTime. I went for a face to face chat prior to the lockdown with Sarah and I immediately clicked with her. She was so warm, understanding, empathetic, non judgmental and she made me laugh when I was in a terrible place.
Throughout the course Sarah made me think differently about I see alcohol and how I feel about myself.  I felt I could tell her anything, without being judged, she has been where I was so totally understands.
I have tried several times to stop drinking, through various different methods without success. Sarah’s methods have worked I am now AF, feel amazing, I’m happy and feel good about myself, the real me has emerged from the black hole that alcohol drags you into and for that I thank her from the bottom of my heart and I’m sure my boy does to.

V Ks Blog

Misplaced Alcohol Awareness

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In March 2007 Sir Ian Gilmore, President of  Royal College of Physicians from 2006-2010, producing a very insightful report titled “Alcohol – can the NHS afford it”, and argued that the Government’s alcohol awareness campaigns focus too much on young binge drinkers. He stressed that older people drinking at home were also at risk of the severe health consequences linked to high alcohol consumption. More adults in the UK drink at home than in any other European country. Alcoholic liver disease has increased tenfold over the last three decades.

Today, we hear and see that drinking daily has been normalised, measured always in glasses, often in bottles of wine. We never measure units at home, just how many refills we have. Two or three glasses are considered acceptable. Taking into account that most who now drink out of 250ml glasses, three of them can easily represent a bottle. In a cohort study from the 1970s, drinking more than 9 units of alcohol a week was considered to be harmful. Nine units is not even 1 bottle of wine at 14% ABV. So now perceived as normal or at least condoned, is very often 70 units a week for women.

The cost to health is being measured, but as Sir Ian pointed out, ignored by Government. The over 55s are now the biggest burden in terms of cost to the NHS with alcohol related illnesses. This of course does not take into account the human and emotional cost that has been wrought before these people become seriously ill. Figures of 3 to 4 billion spent are bandied around, as if that also is acceptable. The average cost of drinking alcohol far exceeds that figure, along with the tax that supports our healthcare service, it is a pretty penny, no matter what you earn.

To reach 55 and over, and succumb to alcohol related illness, you have to have been caning it for some time. You have most probably been parenting and working. I have asked the question so many times and been pushed to one side, that is, where does the Government think the young binge drinkers have come from? There are far fewer these days, in fact drinking by many is rejected, and expressions such as ‘Sober is the new Drunk’ is where it is at, many see it as unattractive and a waste of time and money. They have felt embarrassed by their parents drinking and not tried to copy that. They also see the damage if 1 of the 60 medical conditions to choose from related to alcohol is diagnosed.

We all know that stats are under estimated, none more so than those collected on alcohol misuse, as a once practised member of the Denial Club, I cannot count the number of times I defended my position, with as much skill as a downhill racer.

Yet the Gold Standard of 12 steps is still adhered to, even though, clearly alcohol misuse and its consequences are on the rise. Surely it is time to look at other options? Crucially, I believe, age & gender specific care, a specialist service that exists outside of the mainstream. Or is this simplistic?  Looking at my stats, that don’t lie, I think tailored care has to be the way forward, and alcohol awareness be focused on the pivotal role of parents, and grandparents in society.

Sadly the Sir Ian, nothing has changed.

 

Misplaced Alcohol Awareness

Time to Hear us Roar

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For the last few weeks, the media have been not only been constantly reporting frightening and very intensive news regarding the Coronavirus, but has also caused sheer panic. According to figures I can find, since the start of the pandemic, there has been 165,257 deaths worldwide linked to it. Meantime it is reported that 3 million people a year die from alcohol dependency, in the last 5 months that equates to 1,250,000.
I watch the comments that rage often about those who are affected with alcohol dependency have a choice, that it is a voluntary act, and their fault. That leads to more and more, most especially now isolating themselves, not seeking help, and certainly not going to hospitals for treatment. They already feel like a burden, shameful and riddled with anxiety, perhaps joining online groups but that is as far as they dare go. They are judged, dramatically so. Unlike so many other differences with people today, being hooked on alcohol, is still the last taboo. None of us who began our drinking career with a carefree, fun attitude, decided that we would become drunkards. We are wired differently, and it is a question of all or nothing for us.
If people want vent and blame, then direct your anger to Big Alcohol, when you are vulnerable and often have other mental health issues it makes you easy prey, we are not stupid and realise that our behaviour does seem insane. It is, but so is being unable to access the appropriate care and empathy for those who struggle. The marketing of alcohol as a treat and a ‘must have’ relaxant, the virtual meet ups that now have appeared on social media that are having wine time normalised around 4pm, make the failure of control even more intense.
Many of my clients are over 45, and not connected quite so much to the internet for socialising, at least in what were normal times, those over 55 simply don’t want to be sociable if they have been drinking for years, especially in the current climate, they drink home alone, and when they do have only alcohol to turn to, it is a form of brainwashing doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. The best definition of insanity from Einstein. It is a disease, not a choice.
If there had been as much coverage of this dark and silent Pandemic as there has with Covid-19 , day in, day out would we have sympathy or scorn?
I have enormous respect for the NHS, and it is not their fault that there is lack of funding for help with addictions, but the Governments. Now they are trying to do their absolute best to treat those afflicted with Corona and survive themselves.  The Government is not doing enough to protect them.
We all prefer real time contact, that has now diminished and is causing agony in a strange world, with I believe an even stranger one world once the lockdown is over.
The point of this is to make it truly clear I hope that we need specialist care for alcohol dependency, not blanket coverage. Those working in this area need to come together and formulate a plan to join forces to make this happen, we all are tribal, and need to direct our experiences to those who we completely relate to, and why their circumstances have led them to their misuse.
Therapists and counsellors need to support each other, and attempt to find a solution, we are a worldwide community and rather than being stalled we should be stunned into action to and have an independent organisation that works towards one goal. We cannot be expected to come up with any cures, whilst Big Alcohol is in the driving seat there will never be one, but we must all communicate, and I know that many will be able to raise awareness via the press and news programmes. We need to make the legal drug pushers and Governments accountable and give those who are afflicted with this disease a voice and not be castigated for speaking out.

We must come together and ROAR.

 

Time to Hear us Roar

Helen’s Blog

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I was always a sociable person and had many friends. From an early age I was often invited to parties and I really enjoyed it. During my teenage years alcohol started to be a part of what I consumed at parties and I enjoyed it, but not overly so. But drink alcohol is what we Swedes do when we want to celebrate. With time I started to think that I needed alcohol to enjoy a party, even though I had always enjoyed parties as a child. My preferred tipple was Champagne and Chardonnay. That was what the beautiful women on TV consumed and I wanted to be the same.

I drank alcohol for about 25 years but for some reason I never turned into a glamorous woman portrayed on the TV. I turned into a bloated, red-faced, self-pitying person who lost control over her emotions. After my drinking sessions I suffered from guilt and anxiety since I did not remember what I had said or done. It was horrific.

I never lost my job, my marriage, my children or my house due to my drinking, but I lost my self-respect. And I knew that this was not sustainable. There are loads of drunkards in my family so I knew that things could get a lot worse if I did not pick myself up.

I did try the mainstream groups, but somehow couldn’t make the work for me and felt like a square peg in a round hole. Instead I found Harrogate Sanctuary after searching for therapy. Sarah managed to change my thinking, my drinking thinking! I am now well into my fifth month alcohol-free and I have not felt so good in years.

So what have I discovered in my journey? Quite a few things actually and some of them surprising; You do not need to drink alcohol to have fun at a party. I have now been sober on many social occasions and I am having just as much fun as I did when I was drinking. The difference is that I now remember everything that happened and I don’t get overemotional and insincere.

When you are not experiencing the ups and downs of being drunk and hung-over you get much more mental clarity. With mental clarity comes insight in how you want to spend your time.

Your patience increases tenfold. I used to try and rush my children at bedtime so I could go downstairs and drink chardonnay. Now, I am enjoying our conversations at bedtime and I feel more close to them than ever.

Intimacy with your spouse becomes different. Alcohol can sometimes make you look for sexual kicks while you are on your drunken high, but there is no intimacy in that. Just release. Now when I am initiating intercourse with my husband it is much more intimate since it is a genuine connection that is being made.

I find it easier to handle relatives and difficult situations with calm and presence. Every year there is so much stress surrounding Easter, Birthdays and Christmas, and who spends them with us.

I have an easier time to set boundaries and saying no. People pleasing is quite common among women who misuse alcohol. Initially alcohol provides the relief from trying to meet various demands. It is at wine o’clock you anesthetize yourself from everyone else’s demands. Now I have started to say no and consider my own needs. And that does not include wine.

I don’t procrastinate anymore. I used to think that I was a procrastinator, but it turns out that without alcohol I am not. In fact I am person who gets things done. Who knew? I didn’t because I was so focused on handling my life whilst drinking unhealthily. Since I now don’t drink poison disguised as a treat, I am in a position to be myself and sort things out I am getting my self-respect back. Slowly I am building myself up and showing myself care and consideration. When I was drinking I was always feeling guilty about someone else and never prioritized myself. I felt I did not deserve that, but now I know that I do. I have a right to say no and to take care of my own needs.

I think women today are socialized into thinking that they are responsible for everyone’s emotional needs: family, relatives, colleagues whilst at the same time they have been led to believe that they can have it all. These unrealistic expectations are making women push themselves too hard and if you combine that with alcohol you have set yourself up for a burnout.

I am so glad I stopped drinking alcohol. My life is fuller, more satisfying and I am starting to trust my own judgment again. In this culture you need to be in touch with your inner self and your values. That is not possible with wine in your life as it distorts your inner life. The only thing I regret today is that I did not give up alcohol sooner. What a waste of time wine drinking turned out to be. Now we are all quite understandably terrified of the COVID-19 virus, and in turn I am reading how much more alcohol is being sold, there is no doubt I would have numbed out the fear with wine, rather than face it.

What a waste of time wine drinking turned out to be!

 

 

 

Helen’s Blog